Thursday, January 22, 2009

String Theory


Tonight I saw an elderly woman to provide a little care.  She had the kindest eyes and smile, but could no longer converse.  Just a glimmer of her remaining humanity sparkled briefly in her eyes.   It took me 10 minutes to fix her equipment problem.  Not much time at all.  My patient never said a word while I was working on her, and as I redressed her, she shivered.  I covered her with a blanket, made by her own hand in the most beautiful lace pattern.  As I remarked on her pretty stitch and color work, my patient came alive and talked for 20 minutes about how she knit that blanket.  With cancer stealing her mind, she couldn't talk about anything else, but that's OK.  In spite of the cancer, we found our common denominator and had a long chat about sticks and string.

15 comments:

WT said...

So I guess you had a blanket conversation.

Ruth said...

That is at the same time both very beautiful and very sad.

flydragon said...

Reminds me of my grandfather who had a stroke in his later years that greatly affected his speech. It was very difficult to understand him when he tried to say anthing until it came time to say grace before dinner. Clear as a bell.

debra said...

These are the moments when we know why we do what we do.You did indeed provide care; and you also provided caring.

Rositta said...

That's why this was the right career choice for you. Never doubt yourself again...ciao

Brenda said...

Thanks for sharing that story Rudee. She must have felt so blessed to have someone to talk to about her knitting. I know I would have felt that way.

Rudee said...

WT, I think that about covers it.

Brenda said...

Hi Rudee,
I tagged you for a game at my place. Play if you feel like it or have the time. Have a great day!

Betty Flocken said...

What a beautiful post. I hope someday in the far away future, when my time comes, I have someone like you as my hospice nurse. I have many memories of the differences it has made to me over the years of the kindness of a nurse when I was at my lowest.

I'm sure, though your patient can't speak much, she knew you were her angel yesterday. God sends us many angels in our life - many times in the form of a nurse. I'm really glad I know you

Rudee said...

Well Betty, here is hoping you don't have a need for a hospice nurse for many, many years. I am glad to hear that your interactions with nurses have been mainly good and made a difference for you. My profession consistently gets high scores for one of the most trusted-above doctors and dentists. It does a girl's heart good to know that even though television doesn't always portray us well, we rise above and deliver good care and compassion.

Sandy said...

That is just amazing, that she became animated and talked about her knitting. That is cool!

Winifred said...

It's strange that sometimes you can find something that's a trigger. A lovely story.

Rose said...

That is just the kind of thing that makes the whole day worthwhile.

the rotten correspondent said...

Sometimes all it takes is that one common denominator. It helps if it's something you're both passionate about.

Gill - That British Woman said...

that hit a heart string that story.....what a kind person you are.......I am lost for words....

Gill