Tuesday, February 3, 2009

One Thing Leads to Another


I am always amazed at the places my mouse can take me. Just point and click, or press enter, and I'm a world away. Today I was looking for news on Mt. Redoubt in Alaska. There are warnings this volcano could erupt at any time. One thing lead to another, and there I was looking at webcams from all over Alaska. No eruptions yet, but those people have drawn my pity just the same. The sun doesn't rise until 9:27 AM and sets at 5:22 PM. Honestly, I don't know how they do it! At 5:15 PM Monday, I had to wear my sunglasses while driving. I guess I should quit whining about the hardships here-at least we get about 2 extra hours of daylight than Alaska. That has to be awful. Of course, they get long days in summer, so maybe to them, it evens out. Here's hoping the volcano goes back to sleep.


On the knitting front, I came across a really cool website for yarn.  In an effort to keep from spending my retirement money, I didn't buy anything, and I didn't bookmark the site.  I'm having a harder time staying away from this month's Lorna's Laces at Jimmy Beans.   I've resisted for two lousy days. What are the chances I'll stumble?   Luckily, I've been waylaid by something else. While reading Wendy's blog, I saw the Stash Buster Blanket she's making and fell hard. It looked like it was knit, but it isn't. It's Tunisian crochet, and I'm smitten. This type of crochet is a cross between knitting and crochet.  I like that it's a stash buster blanket-the faster I get rid of stash, the faster I can buy again, so I bought the pattern at Stitchdiva and chrocheted a swatch. The pictures above represent a couple of hours of fiddling around with the different stitches. Tunisian crochet calls for big hooks and the one I'm using is a bit too small. Before I invested in the needle ($30) I'm trying to decide if I like this type of work. If you click on the picture, you can see the stitches in close up. When using the Tunisian simple stitch, the work appears woven. The familar V of a knitted stitch lies sideways. Like knitting, there are all sorts of ways you can manipulate the stitches to create others-including knit and purl stitches. Although Stitchdiva has a great written instructions I found a video tutorial. Not one to like traveling alone, I've provided many links. Now one thing can lead to another for you too.


11 comments:

Miss 376 said...

Can't wait to see the finished result. I've never heard of this type of crochet, but it produces a lovely effect, the blanket should be lovely and warm

flydragon said...

I've mentioned that I'm not a knitter but the more I read your post the more tempted I become. When/If I get to the point where I decide to start, would it be okay if I bombard you with questions? And I do mean bombard:)

Rudee said...

Miss, it's a wonderful technique, though it is a bit difficult to find the needed hooks.

Flydragon, ask away. There are dozens of videos out there to help understand the craft. I think you also have amazing yarn stores near you that would have classes.

Brenda said...

I will have to check these out later. I have been unusually busy lately and have been trying to tear myself away from the computer, so I can get things done. I have been dragging my knitting along with me though and as soon as I have time will do a post about it. This crochet looks very intriguing, as in I could get hooked on it!

Sandy said...

I always like to see your knitting.

I follow earthboppin boards, where they always keep up with volcanoes, earthquakes, etc. There are a few in the ring of fire too, (Japan just had one go off)...

I find it fascinating. I follow weather anomalies, earthquakes, sun cycles...all so interesting to me.

I love the web, I can get lost all day researching stuff.

Rudee said...

Be careful Brenda. It's addicting. Although simple, there is a learning curve for me. I'm confounded by the lack of multiple needles. I'm still practicing though.

Rudee said...

Sandy, I'm always on the USGS site looking for natural happenings like earthquakes. It's a fun way to kill some time. Unfortunately, I tend to kill too much of it in this manner.

Anonymous said...

To be exact, the stle of knitting you are speaking of is called CRITTING...and it requires the use of a Kentucky Small Hook!

Cheryl said...

Your blogs always makes me smile and I am in awe of your talents. I swear, you are going to make a knitter out of me yet. I've already looked into lessons. I really want to do this.

Take care and thanks for the support.
XXXXX

Flutterby said...

Tunisian crochet is my absolute favorite yarn craft - not that I'm all that skillful. Thanks for posting this and for the links. Regarding Tunisian hooks the one I use is a definitely non-professional plastic one but it gets the job done. Some day I'll upgrade but probably not for $30.

fengyebingxueer said...
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